Winter 2016 Adventure – Big Bend National Park or Bust Part Ten

Albuquerque, New Mexico

We pondered optional routes for our trip home and noticed Albuquerque was but a four-hour drive from Carlsbad. A perfect place to stop as we made our way home.

A few miles outside of Roswell, the highway turned bumpy for no apparent reason. There was no sign of buckling or wavy pavement that would cause the truck to shake the way it did. Jon pulled over when it was safe to check things out.

White Volkswagen Beetle with Eyelashes
Spotted in Old Town Albuquerque

My sweet husband walked around the rig, and a few seconds later a string of profanities assaulted my ears. My stomach nose-dived. He tapped on the window. When I opened the door, he said, “!@#%&*. The right rear tire is separating. !@#%&*. We won’t make it to Albuquerque without it blowing out.”

The thought of unhooking the fifth wheel on the side of the road and changing out a tire didn’t sound like a safe plan. “I’ll call AAA.” I grabbed my phone. “Great, no cell service.”

Driving at a slow speed, our five-hour drive just lengthened to six or seven, if we were lucky. U.S. Route 285 turned even lonelier as we crept along with no cell service for miles and miles. We limped into Albuquerque North/Bernalillo KOA around 4:30 p.m., on a Saturday. The tire stores had already closed, so we called AAA to remove the bad tire and put on the spare. Purcell, the same group who adjusted the tire in Yuma, had a store in Albuquerque. All we had to do was wait until Monday.

Sandia Peak Tramway

Not to waste a perfectly good Saturday, we looked for something to do. Why would a height-leery person like me choose a ride on the Sandia Peak Tramway? Was I in the mood to prove something? Conquer my fear?

Hand holding tickets
Tickets to ride

When we arrived, I looked up at the tower on top of the mountain and said, “That doesn’t look so bad, let’s do it.”

Tram cable tower atop a rocky cliff
Are we there yet?

We boarded the tram car, curious to see what was at the top. The car crept closer to the tower, only I didn’t see any platform for getting off. The tram didn’t slow down. It crested the top of the mountain. Then I realized my mistake.

Mountainous canyon with tram suspended from cable
Photo taken from second tower. Holy moly, that’s a long way down.

What lay ahead was a vast canyon, the Domingo Baca Canyon to be exact, and a tram car suspended in mid-air on the other cable inched toward us.

I prayed we would arrive safe and sound with fingers gripping to white-knuckle strength as if that would save me during a disastrous 900 foot (274 meters) drop to the canyon floor.

Sandia Peak landing tower
Whew! We made it.

At the top, we walked with shaky legs to the restaurant for a cup of hot chocolate and a chance to warm up and settle our nerves.

View of evergreen trees, snow, valley below
View from restaurant window

Then we ventured outside to have a look around. On the backside of the mountain stands a ski lift. The snow and freezing temperatures kept us from exploring the three trails.

Red ski lift with valley below and cloudy skies
Sandia Peak ski lift

The Sandia Peak Tramway began operations on May 7, 1966. The two tram cars work together by pulling each other with one car ascending and the other descending. I’m sure there are mechanics involved as well. The Sandia Peak Tramway earns the title as the longest aerial tram in the Americas. The span between the first tower and the second tower is the third-longest span in the world.

Rain clouds, mountains and valley
View south

As of the day before publication of this post, the tram was back in service with COVID-19 safety precautions in place and ticket purchases only online. It might be best to check their website for current conditions, restrictions, and operation days and times.

View of valley and airstrip
View west
Sandie Peak Tramway landing
I came, I saw, I conquered

Although the adventure was super scary, I’m glad I rode the tram to the top. The descent wasn’t quite as bad as the ascent, but still a white-knuckler and we survived.

Old Town Albuquerque

After we recovered from our death-defying adventure, we drove to Old Town Albuquerque for a quick look around the historic village, which was founded in 1706 by New Mexico Governor Francisco Cuervo y Valdes. Visitors will find an assortment of art galleries, stores selling clothing and accessories, gifts and souvenirs, jewelry and antiques, and a variety of specialty stores and museums. After dropping a few bucks on purchases, head to one of the many restaurants, or check-in at a hotel or bed-and-breakfast for a rest.

Old downtown building and street scene
Romero Street Gallery

The San Felipe de Neri Church has stood for over 225 years. The first building built in 1718-19 collapsed in 1792. Several additions and renovations have occurred since 1793 and the building is currently undergoing a multi-project refurbishment.

San Felipe de Neri Church, spires, and crosses
San Felipe de Neri Church
Building with archways and clock
San Felipe de Neri Church wing
Book and gift store signs on building
Book stores survive
Artists and vendors on sideway selling their wares
Street vendors and artists display their wares for sale
Out door restaurant seating
Hacienda Del Rio Cantina
Street scene of old town
Chiles for the picking

We’ve had New Mexico on our travel list since 2016. In 2017, we had other locations at the top of our list. After two trips cut short in 2018 and 2019, we figured 2020 was the year we would finally spend a month exploring.

So far this year, a nasty little bug called COVID-19 has curtailed our plans again. Perhaps this fall will see us venturing out on the road again. Wishful thinking? Most likely, but I need something to look forward to besides endless days walking around my backyard.

When we do get back to New Mexico, will I take another ride on the Sandia Peak Tramway? Maybe it won’t be as scary as the first time. And I might just enjoy the journey—dangling from a cable over a canyon 900 feet from the ground—as much as the destination.

In closing, I present this photo of a New Mexico sky.

Blue skies with puffy white clouds and desert foreground
New Mexico Dreaming

Up next we continue with our 2016 Winter Tour when we arrive in Holbrook, Arizona, to visit the Petrified Forest National Park.

Stay safe

10 thoughts on “Winter 2016 Adventure – Big Bend National Park or Bust Part Ten

  1. As many times as we’ve driven through Albuquerque, we’ve never stayed to explore. That is one tall/long tram ride. I’m always a little nervous riding one. Thanks for the tour! And yeah, I don’t think travel will be a good idea for a while 😐

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We like it there. El Pinto is a great place for New Mexican food. It’s in the North Valley area if you get a chance to pass through. As for the tram, it was worth it for the view, and had it not been so cold, the hikes would have been fun.

      Like

  2. I’ve seen the airport and the quilt stores in Albuquerque. Next time I go I’ll make sure I see more of the town! Next time you go, make sure you see more of Bernalillo. There’s a restaurant there – The Range – that shouldn’t be missed.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Linda, we were just in this part of the world last summer and it is beautiful. We hadn’t been to Albuquerque in many year and we loved re-exploring the city. I love your photos of Old Town. I must admit we missed the Sandia Peak Tramway – that 900′ drop would have had me white-knuckling it, too! 🙂 ~Terri

    Liked by 1 person

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