Eureka, California, Here We Come

We continue our 2014 Pacific Northwest Tour with a quick stop in Eureka, California. A hurried walk through town, taking photos of iconic Victorian homes, and more photos at the marina on Woodley Island was about all we could fit into the few hours we had to explore.

View of Carson Mansion with a raptor in the sky

The Ingomar Club, or Carson Mansion, and the Pink Lady are the first images that appear when conducting an online search for Eureka, California. So excuse me while I add my contributions to the plethora of shots that already grace the internet.

Carson Mansion and Ingomar Club

The Ingomar Club, a private social club in Eureka, has the distinction of owning the Carson Mansion. Their mission is the restoration and preservation of the mansion and the grounds. They offer fine dining and social experiences for its members. Initiation fees and membership dues are not posted on their website. If I have to call or fill out an application, I suspect their fees and dues are out of reach for my budget.

Based on the exterior, I must conclude that Ingomar Club has lived up to its mission in preserving the property. The maintenance of the high standard lumberman William Carson established in 1885 when he built the home is evident. The 19th Century Victorian architecture with all the nooks-and-grannies and decorative wood adornments must need constant care and upkeep.

I desperately wanted to peek inside. Alas, that is not possible. This is a private establishment. Members only. Not open to the public. No tours. Stand over there across the street, take your photos, and “see ya” was the message.

The Pink Lady

The Pink Lady, a Queen Anne Victorian home built in 1889 by William and Sarah Carson as a wedding present to their son Milton, is another story. After the Milton Carson family sold the home it passed through several owners. In 2014 when I took the photos, an architect used it for his office.

Since then, new owners have renovated the home as a vacation rental. It can accommodate up to 10 guests in its 4 bedrooms with 6 beds and 2.5 baths. The full baths feature claw-foot tubs. The modern kitchen includes the necessary amenities and essentials. On redwoodcoastvacationrentals.com, they advertise that you just may get a chance to dine at the Carson Mansion. What was that? Dinner at the Carson Mansion?

“Hey, Jon. Pack the bags. We’re driving to Eureka.”

“Okay, okay, Linda. Calm down already.”

Sorry, I got carried away.

Anyway, both buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The architects for both the Carson Mansion and The Pink Lady were Samuel and Joseph Cather Newsom, Newsom and Newsom Architects of San Francisco. Wait a minute. California Governor Gavin Newsom grew up in San Francisco. Could he be related? Wikipedia says no.

Unable to obtain accommodations at The Pink Lady? I imagine Carter House, Carter Cottage, and Bell Cottage have equally impressive digs for a night or two.

Carter House Inn
Bell Cottage and Carter Cottage

When visiting, don’t forget to take a stroll around Historic Downtown Eureka for more examples of Victorian-era buildings.

Oberon Grill still in business as of August 2019

Eureka boasts not one but two bookstores for a population of approximately 27,000. They probably enjoy business from students attending Humboldt State University, which is only eight miles away.

The Booklegger looks like a place to step in and browse the aisles
Eureka Books is also a thriving enterprise

I couldn’t pass up a photo of this rusted hunk of a train engine splattered with graffiti. It’s not the usual iconic photos of Eureka. I wondered if a group was planning on reviving the abandoned railroad or turn it into a museum at some point. A quick search on the internet did not reveal any plans to do unless I missed something.

Abandoned rolling stock

When a drive over to Woodley Island Marina to see Table Bluff Lighthouse is a must. Although the lighthouse stands only 35 feet tall, ships 20 miles away could see the light. This was because of the bluff’s height. The original structure was built in 1892 and the light was deactivated in 1975. The tower was moved to Woodley Island Marina in 1987.

Table Bluff Lighthouse no longer sits on a bluff

Another local iconic photo is of the sculpture The Fisherman by Dick Crane. It resides at the marina on Woodley Island.

The Fisherman by Dick Crane

As always, I wished we would have had more time to explore Eureka and Humboldt County. I find it frustrating that there is so much to see and so little time in which to see it all.

We make one more stop on our way home. Stay tuned for the Lost Coast and Humboldt Redwoods State Park.

Safe Travels