Summer 2021 New Mexico Tour: Going Home

In this episode, we wrap up our trip to New Mexico. Thursday, July 22, 2021, was decision time. Do we turn the truck for home? No. We weren’t quite ready. Not yet. Hey, Twin Falls was only about 720 miles away, albeit mostly north rather than west. We could make that drive in a couple of days. So, the next day, we loaded up, hooked up, and climbed into the cab.

Depiction of Powell and his crew on an expedition at the Wesley Powell River History Museum

Green River

Shady Acres in Green River, Utah, looked like a good place to stop for a couple of nights. We’d have time to catch up on the laundry, the museum in town looked interesting, and we could visit Green River Coffee Shop. We had picked up a nice batch of freshly roasted decaf coffee beans and pastries at the coffee shop the last time we drove through town.

Campsite at Shady Acres
The Green River Golf Course and farm land surrounds the RV park.
From the museum looking north up the Green River
J.W. Powell River History Museum entrance
Panels and artifact displays tell about the river’s history, geology, and the people who lived and ran the river.
Details in the statue’s base depict scenes from Powell’s expeditions.
This metate is only one of many artifacts displayed.
Running Rapids
Dinosaur exhibit with Utahceratops gettyi
The Boat Room shows different styles of river boats that navigated the rapids, including this bull boat. American Indians and frontiersmen used boats made of wooden frames and covered with buffalo hides.
The boat No Name met its fate at Disaster Falls when it broke in two during John Wesley Powell’s first voyage down the Green and Colorado Rivers. No lives were lost, only cargo.
This was Norman Davies Nevills boat used in the 1940s.
Sample of paintings in the art gallery. Carol Bold paintings: Reflections Adrift, Winding Around the Bend, and Preserve the Reserve.

Outside, next to the museum, is a walking path along the river.

Main Street’s Green River Bridge

Here are a couple of unexpected sights in the museum’s parking lot.

Need a charge traveling I70 in Utah? Tesla has a charge station in the museum’s parking lot.
Watermelon used as a float in the Melon Days Parade?

Sadly, there were no coffee beans for sale on this trip, and the muffin we shared was not what we remembered. Oh well. We were still in the middle of a pandemic and our laundry piles were waiting for us back at the trailer.

John Wesley Powell River History Museum

Jon and I spent a good part of two hours exploring the John Wesley Powell River History Museum. Betsy Hatt, “in memory of Vail Hatt and his commitment to the betterment of the community and tourism,” donated the property where the museum stands.

Conceived in 1987, the 23,000 square foot museum opened its doors in 1990. It is owned and operated by the city in partnership with the John Wesley Powell River History Museum, Inc., established in 2008 as a non-profit organization.

We enjoyed wandering through the historical exhibits and reading the information panels, as well as the art exhibit and the science exhibit featuring dinosaurs. The museum’s focus is on the impact that exploration of the Green and Colorado rivers had on the history and culture of Southeastern Utah.

Visitors will find historical exhibits detailing the Crossroads of the West, John Wesley Powell, the River Runner’s Hall of Fame, and the Boat Room. Temporary art exhibits are also available for viewing.

One of the most notable observations we made about the town of Green River was how neat and clean everything was. Most of the properties, whether occupied or not, had been swept clean of debris and landscaped with flowers planted in barrels.

Following our two-night stay in Green River, we headed north to Twin Falls, Idaho, where our friends Sonia and Marv Baima had moved to from Sparks, Nevada.

Twin Falls, Idaho

On our way to Twin Falls, we stopped for lunch at the Tangerine Eatery in Price, Utah. They serve healthy choices for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. And patrons will find plenty of toppings for their favorite frozen yogurt selection.

We arrived at Twin Falls KOA around 6:30 p.m. after a long drive from Green River. We met up with our friends, Sonia and Marv Bamai for breakfast then went to Shoshone Falls to gawk at the Snake River rushing over the boulders and cliffs. Then headed downtown for good eats and beer at Koto.

Rainbow in the Mist 1
Rainbow in the Mist 2

Historic Twin Falls Downtown

Twin Falls, founded in 1904 as a planned community, is the county seat of Twin Falls County, Idaho, and has seen significant growth and development since 2006. During our visit, we noticed several new shopping centers and recently built homes.

All’s Quiet in Downtown
Need a pot, pan, or other kitchen goodies and gadgets? Rudy’s has you covered.
Guess the painter hasn’t gotten to the upstairs part.
Check out Koto for good food and beer.
No crowds here today.
Take a seat and watch the water dance.
The Surveyor – A Vision of Tomorrow is a bronze sculpture of The Twin Falls surveyor John E. Hayes created by Dave LaMure Jr. Hayes surveyed the town in 1904.

The next day, a hike to the Devil’s Washbowl Outlook along the Snake River helped us compensate for the food and beer intake of the previous day.

Looking from trail back to kiosk and parking lot
Water everywhere
Devil’s Washbowl from a distance
Devil’s Washbowl
View from the end of the cliff

We were glad we had left for our hike early in the day. The air conditioning was a welcome treat when we returned to the car, so we opted for a drive to Murtaugh Lake—I forgot to write the name down, so I could be wrong.

If my memory is correct, this is Murtaugh Lake. Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

For more information on Twin Falls, Idaho, check out our blog post [add link]

Sparks and Victoria City in Nevada

Our next stop was Sparks, Nevada, to meet up with Sonia and Marv again at Virginia City for the Hot August Nights event. And as usual, we stayed at Sparks Marina RV Park.

Picnic and beach area at Sparks Marina and Lake

It’s always a treat to see the Victorian homes in Virginia City.

Reminds me of the Addams Family House
Cozy yellow and green cottage
Love this house with its wrap-around porch

And now for the cars.

The detail on this woody captured my attention.

Woodie, woodie, you so fine!
Updated wood dash with modern digital gauges
Put together like puzzle pieces
The beats of rock-n-roll with Lady and the Tramps
1959 Desoto
Beep, beep goes the jeep
Shelby GT 500 Mustang
Mechanic at work
Marv’s 1967 Jeep Gladiator J-3000
Some of the buildings are in need of repair
Meet us at the Red Dog Saloon
The Way it Was Museum will stir up your memories

And finally, our 2021 Summer New Mexico Tour comes to an end. We’ll be back next time with our 2021 fall tour. Hope you join us as we whirl around Southern California and Lake Havasu City, Arizona, to check in with family and friends.

Safe Travels

4 thoughts on “Summer 2021 New Mexico Tour: Going Home

  1. Dear Linda, I am so impressed with your travels in the time of Covid. Thank you for sharing the beautiful pictures of amazing sites and the narration about the places visited. It is very inspiring, but my husband and I would not be able to be away from our home for this long of a time. Congratulations and thank you again for sharing. Elisabeth

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your comment. You’re quite welcome. We understand we are very fortunate to have the freedom to travel for longer periods of time. The freedom affords us the opportunity to immerse ourselves in the locations and to experience the vibe of a place that’s not possible if only staying a couple days.

      Like

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