Phoenix, Arizona – Part One

Phoenix, Arizona – Part One

Temperatures cooled ten degrees in the Phoenix valley so we left Payson on Sunday, October 13, 2019, and headed into the metropolis. We had been avoiding the big city the past few years, so it was time to stop and visit family and meet new friends.

On our drive to Phoenix, we were impressed that a couple of Westys kept up with us. They’d pull away on the downhills and we’d catch them on the inclines. Climbing a particularly steep grade, we had to pass and leave them behind.

We also marveled at the amount of saguaros marching up the hills.

Ingrid from Live Laugh RV (livelaughrv.net) recommended Pioneer RV Park as a place to stay in the Phoenix area. We enjoyed our stay so much we extended a couple of days. The best part was sharing a couple of happy hours and dinners with Ingrid and Al. Thanks, guys. We had a great time talking with you two.

Our nephews on my side of the family, Scott and Jared, picked us up for dinner one night. It was fun catching up with them and meeting Scott’s better half Leslie and their daughter Alycia. I hope we can stop for another visit soon.

Our next family visit was with our niece, Kelly, and her family on Jon’s side. I promised myself on this trip I would take photos of people. Not quite in the habit, I left my camera at the trailer, so no photos of Kelly and her family. We had a delicious dinner at her house, though. I enjoyed talking with her granddaughter about all her toys (oh, so many toys) and meeting Kelly’s husband and mother-in-law. I even warmed up to the dogs, as long as they didn’t get too close. My fear of strange dogs has not abated, especially when they growl and bark; however, I can tolerate them once I get to know them.

Kelly and her husband are both in real estate. Who better to ask about all the new construction we had seen? We learned that 200 people a day moved into the greater Phoenix area from 2017 to 2018 and Maricopa County—home to Phoenix—was the fastest-growing county in the U.S. No wonder we saw so many housing developments pop up like mushrooms from the desert floor.

Sightseeing is always at the top of our “to do” list and Phoenix was no exception. Below are a few of the places we visited. The rest will come in Part Two.

Desert Botanical Garden

The behind-the-scene docent tour at the 140-acre Desert Botanical Garden was a treat. One of only twenty-four botanical gardens accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, the garden operates with 106 regular staff and approximately 730 volunteers donating 67,364 hours of their time. They have 55 acres under cultivation containing 4,482 species in the living collection and care for 39 rare and endangered species. The photos below are a small sample of what a visitor will see.

The three light-green tree-like structures are Dale Chihuly glass sculptures. The colorful prairie dogs—made from recyclable plastic—are part of the 1,000 animal sculpture exhibit by Wild Rising by Cracking Art. They will be on display through May 10, 2020.

The doors opened to the public in 1939, but World War II halted activity in 1942. A visitor center opened in 1961 and over the years, a library and butterfly exhibit were added. Multimillion-dollar expansions led to research facilities and a desert landscape school.

A group of frogs watched us while we ate lunch under the entry arbor.

The garden is open daily; however, check the website for early or all-day closings. Tours are offered from September through May, the best time to visit. June, July, and August are too hot to walk on the concrete and gravel paths.

The water feature and shade gave us a respite from the heat.
If we weren’t away from home so much, I’d love for my backyard to look like the Steele Herb Garden.
A sundial in the backyard would be cool too.

We enjoyed watching the butterflies in The Butterfly Pavilion. Some of them flitted around so fast we could barely see them, while others landed on flowers and spread their wings as if posing for a photo.

Soon to be butterflies.
Five little butterflies posing for a photo.
Desert scene with prickly pear, barrel cactus, agave, saguaro, and senita. Wait a minute. Where did those little green penguins come from?
Play nice.
Crested saguaro
Replica of an Apache household of old
Blooming barrel cactus
Desert oasis
I liked the fall colors on this plant. Anyone know what it’s called?
Outdoor desert landscaping lab
Reclaimed cement blocks turned to art in this wall feature.
The shade over the greenhouse roof combats the summer sun and protects the specimens.
Inside one of the many greenhouses with an array of specimens.
Cactus, cactus everywhere

We definitely recommend spending a morning or afternoon at the Desert Botanical Garden. Come for the cactus and stay for the art, music, and culinary activities.

Pioneer Living History Museum

While Jon watched football, I went to the Pioneer Living History Museum.  Celebrating its 50th anniversary, the 90-acre property depicts the Arizona territorial period between 1863 and 1912. Some of the buildings are authentic and others are historically accurate reproductions. The museum is a popular place for weddings, field trips for schoolchildren, and special events. Preparations for the All Hallows’ Eve event were in process during my visit.

Pioneer Living History Museum
On certain days, gun shows are presented.
The Merritt Farm complex lets visitors imagine living on a farm in the late 1800s. The house, water tower, granary, and carriage house are all original buildings preserved and restored to depict the early 1900s.
The three-room Meritt House with detached “summer” kitchen. Kitchens were in a separate building to keep the heat from invading the main house during hot summer days.
A glimpse of a bedroom and dining room inside the Merrit House.
An 1800s commercial building housing an exhibit hall and a dress shop.
So much equipment used for printing. Today printing isn’t needed, just open the laptop, type, and send.
Vehicles on display in the carriage house.
Children will like panning for gold.
I wanted to take a look inside this little cabin up on a hill. Then I saw the sign below.
When in Arizona, one must scan all paths in search of snakes. Luckily, we saw none.
Looks like a great place for children to play tag or other old fashioned games.
The church is used for weddings.
Plenty of seating inside.
William Gordon and his family used this original building before it became a school. The school operated from 1885 to 1930. The dunce cap must stir up lively conversations among school children.
Skeleton waiting for All Hallow’s Eve.
The Flying V cabin, with gun ports, is an original building built around 1880. The builder, John Tewksbury, is notable for his participation in the Pleasant Valley War.
Senator Henry Fountain Ashurst grew up in this original 1878 Ashurst Cabin. Ashurst earned the name “Silver-tongued Orator of Congress.” While I peeked inside to take a photo, the wind came up and wrapped the black cloth around me. Luckily, no one was around to hear my scream.
Modest accommodations with all the necessities and a leaky roof.
This house is a McMansion compared to some of the cabins.
Quiet down out there, I’m trying to sleep.
This guy’s been hanging around for way too long.

On some days, costumed interpreters dressed as cowboys, lawmen, miners, gunmen, and Victorian ladies roam the grounds, which must make the town come alive.

Stay tuned for more sightseeing in the greater Phoenix area, including visits to Cave Creek and Carefree, Old Town Scottsdale, Rosson House Museum, and Lake Pleasanton Regional Park.

Safe Travels

9 thoughts on “Phoenix, Arizona – Part One

  1. I’m glad you enjoyed your stay and it was great meeting you two. I would’ve loved going with you to the Pioneer Museum … next time 😊 You should see the Botanical Garden in the spring when things are blooming. So unique and beautiful! 🌵

    Like

  2. Debra

    The Botanical Garden is so very unique and beautiful. So happy that you had a chance to get together with the kids. Just sorry I wasn’t there to enjoy your company. Hugs and love to both of you. And you have once again written a wonderful narrative of your RV’ing adventures, including fantastic photo’s!

    Liked by 1 person

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