Sequoia National Park and Lemon Cove, California

The next day we managed to get through the 10:00 a.m. traffic flow through the construction zone with no delays. The Giant Forest Museum in Sequoia National Park was our first stop where we listened to a ranger talk about the sequoias. Inside the museum, he had planted a couple of seeds, which had sprouted into tiny seedlings. It was difficult to imagine how those seedlings could grow to the size of The Sentinel that stood outside of the museum.

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The Sentinel

Capturing the Sentinel from base to crown was a challenge even though it ranked #42 in the Wikipedia list of the largest sequoia trees.

Our next stop was Moro Rock where we climbed up 350 steps to an overlook. I could have stayed there half a day gawking at the views of the High Sierras, the valley below, and the road leading to and from the Lemon Cove.

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Stairs, Stairs, and More Stairs
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High Sierra Peaks
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Moro Rock Trail

 

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Generals Highway Twists and Turns. Line of Cars Waiting for Construction Pause.

 

 

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Valley Leading to Lemon Cove

 

Tunnel Tree was our next stop.

 

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Tunnel Tree

 

A short drive from Tunnel Tree was Crescent Meadow where there were plenty of picnic tables. Unfortunately, the insects were so fierce we ate in the cab of the truck. I braved the onslaught of flying pests long enough to fast walk to the meadow and grab a few shots.

 

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A Little Buggy Wanted to Share our Lunch

 

 

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Crescent Meadow
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Dried Out Ferns on Crescent Meadow Trail

 

Back on Generals Highway, we continued to the Sherman Tree trail. Parking close to the tree is only available for wheelchair accessible parking. Everyone else needs to follow the signs up the hill and then take the ½-mile downhill trail consisting of steps, ramps, and places to stop and rest.

General Sherman, considered the largest tree in the world, tops out at a height of 274.9 feet, has a circumference of 102.6 feet, a diameter of 32.7 feet, and bole (trunk) volume of 52.508 cubic feet.

Taking a selfie with the tree required a long wait while a group of six guys and gals took photo after photo of each other. They took close-ups, far away shots, this person, then that person, one couple and then another couple, turn to the left, turn to the right, and oh, don’t forget to stretch out your arms. Eventually, we had a chance to stand near the tree.

 

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Finally, Our Selfie with General Sherman.
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This Would be a Nice Shelter

 

Sherman’s healing fire scar.

 

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General Sherman Fire Scar

 

Don’t forget to look up once in a while. It’s a way to see the forest in a whole new light.

 

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Sequoia Tree Crowns

 

Walking up the trail back to our truck did us both in at the end of the day. We skipped the Big Tree Trail on our way out of the park and headed toward Lemon Cove for our last night of our 2017 Fall Tour.

As we waited in line for the construction crew to finish up for the day and release the traffic, we reminisced about all the places we had traveled and all that we had seen. Utah gave us the hoodoos in Bryce Canyon National Park, colorful cliffs in Kodachrome State Park, a rushing river, and steep cliffs in Zion National Park.

We walked where dinosaurs once roamed and gazed at Coral Pink Sand Dunes. The drive into Arizona to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon took us through meadows and gave us a glimpse of the Kachina Peaks Wilderness, including Humphreys’ Peak, from the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and close up in Flagstaff from the observatory.

Prescott, Arizona, offered us trails to hike, rocks to climb, and introduced us to Sharlot Hall. California gave us trails among the Cholla, Joshua trees, and jumbo rocks in Joshua Tree National Monument and the Giant Sequoias in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park.

Moro Rock from the road

 

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Moro Rock From Road

 

Here’s a Mystery Tree. Can anyone identify?

 

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What Kind of Tree am I?
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Mystery Tree Silhouette

 

After our white-knuckle ride back to Lemon Grove, we stopped for gas and took photos of some of the old buildings in this tiny town.

 

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Old Timey Richfield Station
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Quaint Green House

 

These buildings could use some tender care to restore them to their previous beauty. The name Victor Allred is barely visible on the one building expressing pride to be the owner of the enterprise that once occupied the space. When did businesses cease to use the owner’s name? It seems now most businesses make up words or some kind of catchy acronym to name their businesses.

 

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A Little TLC is Needed Here

 

After 33 days, we were ready to head home on October 27, 2017. It was time to enjoy the holidays and recharge for our 2018 Winter Tour.

Our main destination for our next tour is Galveston, Texas, for our niece’s wedding. We haven’t quite worked out which route to take or what we will see along the way. Where will we go after the wedding? Who knows which direction the wind will blow us.

Safe Travels

 

Lemon Cove, California, and Kings Canyon National Park

We selected Lemon Cove RV Park in Lemon Cove, California, on October 25, 2017, for our three-night stay 25 miles outside Sequoia National Park. Although close to the road, the campsites sit below street grade dampening the vehicle noise. After getting settled, we drove to the Sequoia National Park visitors’ center to pick up a map and newsletter and inquire about the signs we had seen about the construction delays.

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Mountains Tower Above Kings Canyon Floor

I’ve heard stories about drivers ending up in precarious situations if they rely too much on their GPS. I have to admit our trusty GPS backup, a map, got the better of us. Having missed the traffic release window on Generals Highway through Sequoia, our map showed a straight shot north to the Kings Canyon entrance. Thinking it would be faster than waiting to get through the construction zone, we took the Highway 245 detour. It was a lovely drive through citrus, nut, and olive orchards, a few vineyards, and small farm towns. Then the road turned dicey when it became narrow and curvy and increased elevation with each hairpin turn. What happened to the straight line I saw on the map? Once committed, it made no sense to retrace our route. Onward we continued through forested areas and remote property until the road intersected with Highway 180, which took us to the Big Stump Entrance of Kings Canyon.

General Grant Tree Grove

Our first stop inside the park was at the General Grant Tree Grove, which contains a 1/3 mile paved loop trail to General Grant Tree, the Fallen Monarch, the Centennial Stump, and Gamlin Cabin.

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General Grant through the Trees Doesn’t Look so Big Here

General Grant, believed to be 1,650 years old, was named in 1867 after Ulysses S. Grant, a Union Army General and the 18th president of the United States. The tree stands 267.4 feet tall, has a girth of 107.6 feet, and estimates peg it at 46,608 cubic feet of wood and bark. What I find impressive is that the tree continues to add board feet and bark, increasing in not only height but also girth.

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General Grant Crown

All about Sequoias

Although Sequoias are the largest living individual thing on the planet, they are not the tallest, widest, or even the oldest. Their trunks, however, occupy more space than any other single organism.

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Fallen Monarch Measures 124 Feet from Roots to Top. No One Knows When it Fell

The trees occur naturally in groves on the western slopes of the California Sierra Nevada Mountains within a 260-mile long by 15-mile wide strip between 5,000 and 7,500 feet above sea level.

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Centennial Stump is Partially Seen Behind and to the Right of the Sign

The trees’ bark, containing very little pitch and an abundance of tannins, provides built-in protection from burrowing insects, fungi, and fire. In fact, fire is one of the ways the tree reproduces. It clears the undergrowth and low branches and allows the tiny (.16 – .20 inches long by .04 inches wide by .04 inches broad) seeds to open up and flourish. Squirrels and insects also can cause the seeds to release from the cones and sprinkle the forest floor. A cone holds on average 230 seeds, but a tree may only produce one offspring during its entire lifetime of thousands of years.

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Hey, What Are You Doing Here?

A sequoia can even heal itself, after it has been burned, by generating new bark around its blackened trunk. The sequoias are also self-pruning, shedding lower branches as it grows taller and reduces sunlight escaping through the leaves.

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Example of Burned Trunk

It is a good thing that the wood of the Sequoia is fibrous and brittle and not ideal for construction. Otherwise, the Gamlin Brothers may have destroyed all of them. They held a logging permit in the area. At one point, loggers did fell the ancient trees for shingles, fence posts, and even toothpicks. Imagine how many toothpicks one of the beautiful giants could produce.

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Gamlin Cabin Built 1872 To House the Gamlin Brothers who Grazed Cattle Until 1878

Kings Canyon

A drive through Kings Canyon gives visitors a snapshot of some of the attractions that make California a favorite place to visit. Towering granite cliffs, a rushing river, golden grass, and yuccas captured our attention as we drove beside the Kings River. Most of the campgrounds had already been closed for the winter, and even gates prevented driving down some of the roads. We stopped at Canyon View expecting a spectacular landscape only to find the view blocked by overgrown trees. I think someone needs to rename the overlook.

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Contrasting Rock
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Kings River
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View Through the Forest

Montecito-Sequoia Lodge

On our way toward Sequoia National Park, we stopped in at the Montecito-Sequoia Lodge, an all-inclusive rustic resort. The property reminded me of the setting in the Dirty Dancing movie. Open year round, room rates include lodging, meals, and activities. I wouldn’t mind staying there a night or two. It sure would be more convenient than driving in and out of the park each day.

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October Colors

As the sun fell lower in the sky, we continued out of the park, with no delays through the construction zone where the crews had finished up for the day. Low gear was required to avoid burning up the brakes while descending into the valley. With growling stomachs, we watched for the first restaurant to grab a bite to eat before we continued back to Lemon Cove.

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Forest Mushrooms

 Gateway Restaurant & Lodge in Three Rivers looked like a good bet, and we were not disappointed. We sat at a table overlooking the Kaweah River illuminated by outdoor lighting. The snapper, the best I had ever eaten, was accompanied by a fluffy baked potato, plenty of butter and chives scooped on top, and perfectly cooked squash. The memory of the meal makes my mouth water.

Join us next time for a peek at Sequoia National Park.

Safe Travels