2014 Carlon Falls and Yosemite

Our 2014 adventures continued with a trip to Yosemite National Park for a few days in September. Our son and his better half met us there for some hiking and fishing. Yosemite, like most of the nation’s parks, requires reservations several months in advance. Luckily, Yosemite Lakes RV Resort had space for us. Although it was only 5.5 miles from the entrance, it was another 19 minutes to reach the valley.

View from our campsite at Yosemite Lakes RV Resort

Carlon Falls

We chose the Carlon Falls hike as our first activity. The trail to the falls is 2.8 miles roundtrip from the trailhead and travels through Yosemite National Park Wilderness. Six years after the August 2013 Rim Fire, the park’s website still warns of danger trekking through the burn area. Loose and falling rocks, and trees weakened from the fire and drought, could cause injury or even death to unsuspecting hikers.

Approaching the Yosemite National Park Wilderness gate on the Carlon Falls trail

In 2014, we found the trail well marked as we passed through burned-out logs and fire scared tree trunks and then we entered a lush green forest and underbrush. The south fork of the Tuolumne River meandered through the rocks and vegetation as it made its way toward the main river.

One year after the 2013 fire, these little seedlings had sprouted among the charcoal debris. I wonder if they survived the remaining drought and harsh conditions.

Little sprouts vying for survival in the ashes

The trail seemed to disappear just short of the falls, blocked by huge boulders.

The holes in the granite reveal a powerful river compared to what we saw.
Kevin navigates the boulders with ease
No, this isn’t an ad for Arrowhead water, just a cute pick of Bailey
JT sizes up a fish he saw

I wasn’t quite as quick to scramble over the impediments as the others, especially with my pack strapped to my back and a camera slung around my neck. I’m not so sure it was worth it given our visit was in the fall during the middle of what turned out to be a seven-year drought.

Carlon Falls

Images of the falls online show a wall of water rushing over the granite wall and mist rising from the pool. During our visit, it was not such a spectacular sight due to the drought, but it was peaceful back there. With birds flitting among the trees, squirrels scampering about, and the water tumbling over the granite wall and gently splashing into the pond, it was the perfect respite after the boulders.

Fishing

Fishing is not allowed in the Park, but at the Carlon Falls parking and picnic area, there is access to the south fork of the Tuolumne River. The gang grabbed their gear, baited up, and stood back to wait for the fish to come and take a taste of whatever goodies covered up the hook.

Fishing is not my thing. I just can’t bring myself to hurt the rainbow-striped critters, so off I trotted up and down the stream looking for interesting artifacts to photograph. Here are a few things that caught my eye.

Obviously, the water runs deep enough at times to erode the soil from these tree roots
A granite wall keeps the water in check
Layers upon layers upon layers of graffiti, modern-day petroglyphs, on the bridge support
Raindrops cling to branches after a short rain
Poisonous or edible? I’ll leave it for the bears.
Lichen growing on a downed tree limb
A bridge over peaceful waters
Watch your step across the reflecting pool
Let’s see. One, two, three, . . . Perhaps 30 years old?

When I returned from my photo walk, the gang had caught enough trout for a small dinner feast. I may not like to fish, but I sure do like to eat them.

Yum, dinner!

Yosemite

Tunnel View Overlook

On June 30, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill creating the Yosemite Grant, which was turned over to California to operate. The area surrounding the grant became Yosemite National Park in 1890.

From left, Jon Todd (my hubby), Bailey Bishop (Kevin’s better half), and Kevin Todd (my son)

Seeing damage caused by overgrazing and other commercial activities in and near the park, John Muir, among many other conservationists, lobbied President Theodore Roosevelt to have the federal government take control of the grant and expand and protect the park. Three years later, Roosevelt signed the bill that accomplished the conservationist’s goal.

Site of meeting between Muir and Roosevelt
Jon, Bailey, and Kevin with El Capitan in the background
Half Dome, of course

With limited time to visit Yosemite, we selected a one-way bus ride to Glacier Point and a hike down the mountain on Four Mile Trail. I was concerned my knees might falter on the 3,200′ downhill slope.

We joined the crowds along the paths and overlooks around the visitor’s center to marvel at the breathtaking views.

View from Glacier Point overlook
Half Dome in the shadows
The ancient art of marking up an object with petroglyphs and pictographs lives on in modern times
“Come on, everybody, here we go.”
Rear of Half Dome
“Look at this great pic I took.”
Way down in the valley there are roads and vehicles and buildings. At this distance, they fade into the scenery.
Never can take too many pictures of Half Dome
Nevada Falls
Gnarly tree stump
“Yes, dear. You’re so strong and handsome.”
Four Mile Trail continues around the giant granite slab
A fern finds a perch
First sign of fall

My knees held up during the hike thanks to the switchbacks that eased the descent. We all were glad to come to the end, visit the restroom, and head back to our vehicle. I’d sure like to try hiking up the trail someday.

Safe Travels