Quincy and Graeagle in Plumas County, California

Exploring new territory is our favorite type of adventure and Plumas County in California was a place we had yet to explore. So, on October 4, 2014, we headed north from Yosemite along State Route 49 to Interstate 80, and then north on State Route 89. We had often passed State Route 89 near Truckee, when driving to and from Reno, Nevada, and wondered what lay beyond the thick forest. We were about to find out.

We selected Pioneer RV Park in Quincy as base camp for four nights.

Campsite at Pioneer RV Park in Quincy, California

James H. Bradley, one of the organizers of Plumas County, donated land for the county seat that would become Quincy. Bradley had named his farm in Illinois after John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) and decided that name was just fine for the new town in California. In 1858, the town was formally recognized. The estimated population for Plumas County in 2018 was 18,800, of which about 1,900 people lived in Quincy.

We began our exploration at Buck’s Lake on the Oroville-Bucks Lake Road. Surrounded by the Bucks Lake Wilderness and Recreation area, residences, and resorts, visitors can enjoy fishing, camping, hiking, and water sports during the spring and summer months.

Old fishing cabins surround Buck’s Lake

When winter descends on the valley that sits at 5,200’ elevation, the snowmobiles and snowshoes came out to play. Several campgrounds accommodate both tents and RVs in Plumas National Forest or in private campgrounds. Only a small number of full hookup sites are available.

Buck’s Lake
Buck’s Lake Dam

Our next stop was Thompson Lake where the trees showed off their yellow and gold fall colors.

Thompson Lake

We hiked around Gansner Park where the green grass and shade from the tall pines made for a pleasant stroll. Overall, the park was in good order, except for the tennis courts. It looked like they had been abandoned for several seasons.

Gansner Park
Abandoned tennis courts at Gansner Park

The next day we headed out to the Cascade Trailhead. The Spanish Creek flows next to the trail and leads to five small falls. The trail was originally built to transport water for hydraulic mining and used as a supply road for the Western Pacific Railroad. Fall had surely made its way into the canyon.

Fall marches on
Cascade Trail
Spanish Creek
One of five short falls
Angel wings or a heart?
Spanish Creek
More fall colors
Purple daisies look more like it’s spring

The Union Pacific railroad runs through the canyon. I had seen the tunnel high up on the canyon wall.

Union Pacific train tunnel

Then the roar and thunder of a freight train grew in intensity and soon there it was chugging away and disappearing into the tunnel.

Union Pacific train was right on time

We moved our base camp to Movin’ West RV Park in Graeagle to explore another area of Plumas County. Once a company mill town, recreation now drives Graeagle’s economy. With a championship 18-hole golf course, tennis courts, nearby Plumas County National Forest and lakes basin and the Plumas Eureka State Park, visitors have plenty of activities to enjoy during their stay.

The Plumas Eureka State Park museum was closed when we arrived, which should have disappointed us. Instead, we managed to learn about the artifacts while wandering around the exterior grounds and examining the old gold-mining equipment and buildings. Although it would have been nice to have a docent tell us the history of the place, we were able to grab enough information from reading the signs, which told each object’s story.

Welcome to Plumas Eureka State Park
No one home at the museum
Mohawk stamp mill
Trestle
Stone wheel
Metal Wheel
This Huntington Mill was used to crushed gold-bearing ore for processing
Replica assay office
JT inspecting the antique mining equipment

Fall had definitely descended upon the Madora Lake Loop Trail.

Madora Lake Loop Trail
Hmm, does he want to go through there or not?

We finished our exploration of Plumas County at the Plumas National Forest Lakes Basin Recreation Area. The lush forest, crystal blue lakes, and fall-inspired scenery was the perfect setting to close out our adventures. We selected the loop trail that skirted Big Bear Lake and passed by Little Bear Lake, Cub Lake, and Silver Lake.

Big Bear Lake
Big Bear Lake
Little Bear Lake
Silver Lake
Standing among the undergrowth
Put down the camera and come on
Bear Lake and Long Lake Trail
Jeffrey Pine
Time for a break
Decaying log

Putting together these past posts has made me homesick for the thick forests, alpine lakes, and trails. I want to lace up my shoes, sling my camera around my neck, and walk the trails exploring new territory.

Jon’s back has been pain free for almost a week as I write this post. Now comes the slow process of avoiding another flare up and regaining strength and stamina. However long that takes, I have hope that one day soon we will once again climb mountains and sit along an alpine lakeshore eating our lunch.

Safe Travels